It's the call of the wild or something like that, somewhere in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. We're pretty sure it's a bit difficult to spot bears, or even wolves in the Upper Peninsula.

I can honestly say it would be too soon if I were to come across any of these wild animals, especially a wolf or a grizzly bear. No thanks!

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But how about this story, a man from Canada recently shot and killed a collared wolf from Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

The hunter killed the wolf in early December after the wild animal traveled over 4,000 miles. Can you believe that? So exactly where did this wolf go on his long journey?

According to mlive.com:

A map plotted by Michigan Department of Natural Resources researchers showed this male wolf traveled through Wisconsin, then Minnesota, made a short stop in North Dakota, crossed the Canadian border into Ontario, then swung up into the Whiteshell area of Manitoba, where the hunter’s bullet found him. In all, this wolf had traveled 4,200 miles in about 18 months.

The collar was attached to the wolf back in 2021 and basically detailed where this wolf traveled to and from during the summer of 2021 until the wolf was killed in December 2022.

Speaking of wolf collars, mlive.com adds:

Michigan’s wolf population has been stable for the last several years, with anywhere from 600 to 700 wolves spread out across every county in the state’s Upper Peninsula. There’s been evidence a few wolves have crossed the Straits of Mackinac to enter the Lower Peninsula, but there’s no documented population there so far, the DNR says.

That's a lot of wolves roaming around in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. I think it's amazing to collar an animal with a GPS device that tracks how many miles they can travel during an extended period of time.

 

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