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As the hours go by, things begin to get tight and that feeling of literal powerlessness closes in.

How long has it been?

Should we call again?

Are they even working on it?

Last weeks storms knocked the power out for a fair amount of Michiganders.

Some are still without.

Michigan AG Dana Nessel had some strong and very pointed words for our friends at Consumers Energy.

While saluting the crews and "those who have worked tirelessly the last several days on behalf of the communities they serve," she also demanded the utility companies work hard to restore trust with their customers.

Read More: AG Nessel Calls Out Consumers Energy, Insists They 'Do Better'

How about we start here?

If your power has been out for a substantially long period of time, Consumers Energy is giving you an opportunity to apply for an "outage credit".

If you meet any of the following criteria, you may qualify for an electric outage credit:

  • Service interrupted for more than five days (120 hours) during catastrophic conditions (10 percent or more of Consumers Energy customers affected).
  • Service interrupted for more than 16 hours during normal conditions.
  • Service interrupted more than seven times in a 12-month period.

Please complete the Electric Outage Credit form online or call 517-788-8370. (Consumers Energy)

You can read more on the story from our broadcast partners at WILX News 10.

How long has your power been out? Have you applied for the credit? Tell us your story on our free station app.

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