Do we really need to concern ourselves with the speed of mail delivery? If you would like my opinion, only if I'm about to receive a check in the mail.

Most of the time I could care less. The longer I have to wait for bills to show up in my mailbox, the better the mail service is.

Get our free mobile app

Whether you like it or not, beginning on the first day of October, it may take a little longer to send or receive certain items.

According to mlive.com:

At the of the month, the U.S. Postal Service will change service standards for first-class mail and packages, a move that will lengthen delivery time for about 30% of its volume. The change, as reported by CNET, means letters, parcels and magazine subscriptions that are sent from longer distances could take up to 5 days to arrive instead of 2 or 3.

I see no reason to make a big deal out of this unless you're so impatient, that you just can't wait an additional 2 or 3 days for your mail to arrive.

I remember ordering a Sears part for my vacuum clean about a month ago, and everything worked out just fine. It might have been a few days late or so, but as long as I get the part, we're good.

Mlive.com also tells us:

Most first-class mail-roughly 61%-and almost all periodicals-93%- will be unaffected by the change and the standards for single-piece first-class mail traveling within a local area will continue to be 2 days. Mail sent from further away, including monthly child tax credit payments could be delayed, however.

CHECK IT OUT: 10 Items Might Be in Short Supply This Winter