Being a police officer is no easy task by any means. It takes a lot of dedication, training, road skills, people skills, and so much more.

Both my dad and brother were police officers for the Lansing police department for close to 30 years. And quite honestly, most police officers who make it that long on the force deserve so much more than just a pension.

When my brother was a sergeant with the Lansing Police Department, he had several partners who were women and they were and still are excellent police officers.

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And that's one of the biggest reasons why the Michigan State Police would like to see more women on the police force.

According to the Lansing State Journal:

MSP is one of more than 100 police forces that have signed on to the "30 by'30 Initiative," which posits that female officers are less likely to use excessive force, make fewer discretionary arrests and see better outcomes for crime victims, especially in assault and abuse cases. MSP signed on to the program in November, a few years after it was born of a U.S. Department of Justice report on women in policing.

I really like the part about seeing better outcomes for crime victims, which includes assault and abuse cases.

I personally know of three female police officers who take their jobs very seriously and only want to do what's best to make things right. To protect and serve is exactly what being sworn in as a police officer is all about.

The Lansing State Journal also adds:

"Not that men can't be, but I think women are born empathetic," said 1st Lt. Sarah Krebs, co-chair of the MSP resource group for women. "When you put that in an investigative role, that you truly care for people, it makes you a better investigator"

The goal now is for Michigan State Police recruiters to get 30% women on the police force even though more young people are not interested in police work.

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