Scientists now say those who daydream are smarter and more creative than their laser focused counterparts.

Scientists at Georgia Tech examined more than 100 people, scanning their brains with an MRI while the subjects were directed to spend five minutes focusing on an item.

According to, the imaging showed that different parts of the brain worked simultaneously in some subjects, indicating they were thinking of other things while supposedly concentrating on the given item.

Those results, and those of a questionnaire in which subjects were asked how much time they spent daydreaming in a given day, revealed that those who multi-tasked, had more efficient brains, resulting in better scores on aptitude and other tests.